The MOT changes on 20th May 2018 - How does this affect me?
 

The way that the MOT test works in England, Scotland and Wales will change from Sunday 20 May 2018.

The changes will affect cars, vans, motorcycles and other light passenger vehicles.
 

Watch a video of Neil Barlow, Head of MOT Policy at the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA), briefly explaining what’s changing, or read the video transcript:

Click here to watch the DVSA Video

All MOT testing stations will categorise defects found during the MOT as either:
 

  • dangerous

  • major

  • minor

 

We must record all dangerous, major and minor defects.  DVSA can take disciplinary action against any MOT testing station if we don’t. 

 

Government regulations say that as a driver, you can be fined up to £2,500 and get 3 penalty points for using a vehicle in a dangerous condition.

The MOT inspection manual makes it clear which defect category is to be used, depending on the type of problem and how serious it is.  We will still be able to give ‘advisories’.

I have heard that Vintage cars are exempt from MOT - can you tell me more?

  • If the vehicle was first registered between 1 and 7 January 1978, you don’t have to pay vehicle tax.

  • If the vehicle was first registered between 1 January 1960 to 31 December 1977, you must get an MOT, but don’t have to pay vehicle tax.
      

  • If the vehicle was first registered before 1 January 1960, you don’t have to get an MOT or pay vehicle tax.
     

You must apply for a vehicle tax exemption to stop paying vehicle tax. This is sometimes called putting a vehicle into the ‘historic tax class’. 
 

You don’t have to apply to stop getting an MOT for your vehicle each year. However, you must still keep it in a roadworthy condition.  You can be fined up to £2,500 and get 3 penalty points for using a vehicle in a dangerous condition.

How often does my car need a service?

Different manufacturers recommend different service intervals for different models of vehicle depending on the average annual mileage of that vehicle. We would suggest that most vehicles fall into one of three categories based on the (M.P.A.) miles per annum.


 

Low miles per annum

If you only do a small mileage say less than 6000 miles per annum your vehicle only really requires one routine service per year. In this instance we would recommend that the best time to have this service done is 6 months after your annual MOT inspection, this way all the main safety checks are being done twice per year.

Average miles per annum

10000 miles per annum is around average, at this miles per annum you can still get away with only one routine service per year. Again have the service half way between MOTs. However, we would advise you to have the oil and filter replaced and the brake wear checked along with the MOT

High miles per annum

High mileage is obviously anything over 10000 miles per annum, over 12000 miles per annum your car really needs a routine service every 6 months.

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